How Does the Employer Match on my Employee 401(k) Work?

Based on the specifics of your employer’s 401(k) plan, your contributions to your retirement savings may be matched by employer contributions in several ways. Employers usually match a percentage of employee contributions, up to a certain portion of their total salary. Other employers match employee contributions up to a certain dollar amount, regardless of employee compensation.

Investopedia published an article, “How 401(k) Matching Works,” that explains the mysteries of employer match contributions.

The specific terms of 401(k) plans vary considerably. Other than the requirement to adhere to certain required contribution limits and withdrawal regulations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the sponsoring employer decides on the specific terms of each 401(k) plan. Whatever the match amount, it’s free money added to your retirement savings. Don’t neglect to take advantage of it!

Employers typically match employee contributions, up to a percentage of annual income. However, this limit may be imposed in one of a few different ways. You employer may elect to match 100% of your contributions, up to a percentage of your total compensation, or to match a percentage of contributions up to the limit. Although the total limit on employer contributions remains the same, the second situation requires you to contribute more to your plan to get the maximum match possible.

Some companies match up to a certain dollar amount, regardless of income. This limits their liability to highly compensated employees.

A partial matching scheme with an upper limit is common. If your employer matches 50% of your contributions that equal up to 6% of your annual salary, and you earn $60,000, the contributions equal to 6% of your salary, or $3,600, are eligible for matching. However, your employer only matches 50%, so the total matching benefit is capped at $1,800. Under this formula, you must contribute twice as much to your retirement to reap the full benefit of employer matching. However, if your employer matches a certain dollar amount, you have to contribute that amount to maximize benefits, regardless of what percentage of your annual income it may represent.

All deferrals are subject to an annual contribution limit dictated by the IRS. For employers in 2019, the total contributions to all 401(k) accounts held by the same employee (regardless of current employment status) is $56,000, or 100% of compensation, whichever is less. However, elective salary deferrals made by employees are limited to $19,000. Thus, an employee can contribute up to the annual salary deferral limit to their 401(k) each year, and an employer may contribute up to the IRS annual limit via match or additional compensation. The sum your employer matches doesn’t count toward your annual salary deferral limit.

The IRS also allows those over age 50 to make additional “catch-up” contributions to motivate employees close to retirement to ramp up their savings. For 2019, the annual catch-up contribution limit is $6,000.

In addition to reviewing your 401(k) plan’s matching requirements, learn about your plan’s vesting. This dictates the degree of ownership you have in employer contributions, based on the number of years of with the company. Even if your employer has a generous match, you may forfeit some or all of those contributions, if your employment is terminated (either voluntarily or involuntarily) prior to a certain number of years has elapsed. However, all contributions you make to your retirement savings account are 100% vested at all times and can’t be forfeited.

Reference: Investopedia (February 4, 2019) “How 401(k) Matching Works”

Suggested Key Terms: 401(k), Vesting, Retirement, Employer Matching, Catch-Up Contributions

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What Are the Five “Must Have” Estate Planning Documents?

WTHR 13’s recent article, “The 5 legal documents every adult should have” lists the five key documents involved in estate planning.

  1. General Durable Power of Attorney. This document states who you want to make decisions, if you’re unable to do so for yourself. Without it, your family may have to petition the courts to become your legal guardian, which can be time consuming and expensive. A power of attorney allows the person whom you select, to pay your mortgage or rent and your bills.
  2. Health Care Power of Attorney. This document plans for the situation, if you are unable to make your own health care decisions. You name someone you trust, like family members or friends, to do this on your behalf.
  3. Will. This says that when you pass away, here’s what I want to happen. A will states who will get your assets after your death. If you don’t have a valid will in place, the state laws of intestacy will govern what will happen to your estate—which may not be what you want.
  4. Living Will. This is the document in which you state your instructions for end-of-life care, such as life support. This document is used to make certain that your family and physicians know what you want your end-of-life care to be. A living will is much different than a will.
  5. Revocable Living Trust. This document can be important, if you’re a parent with young children and would like your assets passed down properly to your children, if you die. Typically, if children are under 18 or 21, they’re legally minors and can’t receive assets. A trust can help coordinate their receiving your property.

An experienced estate planning attorney can help you with the creation of these documents, while creating an overall plan so that your wishes are followed, your legacy is protected and your family is secure.

Reference: WTHR 13 (April 17, 2019) “The 5 legal documents every adult should have”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Wills, Capacity, Guardianship, Revocable Living Trust, Probate Court, Inheritance, Power of Attorney, Healthcare Directive, Living Will, Intestacy

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What are the “Six L’s” of Small Business Planning?

Failing to conduct long-term personal planning can create a reality, where a business owner under-insures and underinvests outside her own companies.

Think Advisor’s recent article, “The 6 L’s of Small-Business Planning” says that a successful business essentially becomes a security blanket. That’s because business owners don’t adequately prepare for events that could change the course of their financial well-being. It’s critical to address the important events that can disrupt everything personal and business.

Liquidity: If a business owner has to write a big check for some unexpected repairs after a storm, the money must come from somewhere. Small businesses rarely have substantial liquidity, because so much of their capital is tied up in the company. Therefore, a line of credit is the most frequent solution for owners with this situation.  You should instead try to ensure that you have access to cash in the short term, if necessary.

Long-term disability: In many instances, business owners are the main contributors to their small company’s success. If they can’t work, the whole company can suffer. She should have a plan to protect against this scenario. First, it is important to identify who can step into a leadership role for a short time. If the disability is long term, examine the ways in which it might affect the company’s value and succession plan. You can purchase business overhead insurance or policies that offer income replacement. You can also create buy-out agreements, so key employees can buy out the disabled business owner.

Loss of life: In the event that an owner suddenly dies, you should have life insurance to fund a buy/sell plan. Without a plan, you may become forced to work with your deceased business partner’s spouse.

Long-term care: Baby boomers with business wealth may wonder what will happen if they need significant medical care, which is a legitimate concern. There’s an additional consideration: the elderly parents of business owners. If an owner steps away to help provide care for an ailing parent, the potential disruption to the company may be significant. Look at where the capital is going to come from, to offset the cost of long-term care for family members, because you don’t want a forced liquidation of business assets.

Longevity: Consider the impact to the company, if the owner has an unusually long life. This should include an examination of how that person’s role will change and who will succeed them through phases of potentially decreasing interest and capacity.

Legacy/legal: Look at what the business owner envisions as her legacy for the future. There are numerous types of trusts, gifts and legal vehicles can be used to help make certain that the business won’t be ruined by taxes, when ownership is passed to the next generation. Talk to an estate planning attorney about doing this the right way.

At each annual business review, review your plans to see if they can still be effective responses to the six Ls of small business planning.

Reference: Think Advisor (May 28, 2019) “The 6 L’s of Small-Business Planning”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Capacity, Trusts, Asset Protection, Gift Tax, Retirement Planning, Business Succession Planning

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