Estate Planning for Parents with Young Children

Attorneys who focus their practices on estate planning, know that not every story has a happy ending. For some of them, it’s a professional mission to make sure that young parents are prepared for the unthinkable, says KTVO in the article “Family 411: Thinking about estate planning while your kids are young.”

It’s a very easy thing to forget, because it’s so unpleasant to consider. The idea of becoming seriously ill or even dying while your children are young, is every parent’s worst fear. But putting off having an estate plan with a will that prepares for this possibility is so important. Doing it will provide peace of mind, and a road forward for those who survive you, if your worst fears were to come true.

Start with a will. In a will, you’ll name a guardian, the person who would be in charge of rearing your children and have physical custody of them. Don’t assume that your parents will take over, or that your husband’s parents will. What if both sets of parents want to be the custodians? The last thing you want is for your in-laws and parents to end up in a court battle over custody of your children.

Another important document: a trust. You should have life insurance that will be the source for paying for the children’s education, including college, summer camps, after-school activities and their overall cost of living. In addition, proceeds from a life insurance policy cannot be given to a minor.

However, what if your son or daughter turned 18 and were suddenly awarded $500,000? At that age, would they know how to handle such a large sum of money? Many adults don’t. A trust allows you to give clear directions regarding how old the child must be, before receiving a set amount of money. You can also stipulate that the child must complete college before receiving funds or reach certain milestones.

An estate plan with young children in mind, must have a Power of Attorney for financial decisions and one for medical decisions. That allows a named person to make important financial and medical decisions on behalf of the child. You may not want to have their legal guardian in charge of their finances; by dividing up the responsibilities, a checks and balances system is set into place.

However, for medical decisions, it is best to have one primary person named. In that way, any care decisions in an emergency can be made swiftly.

While you are creating an estate plan with your children in mind, make sure your estate plan has the same documents for you and your spouse: Power of Attorney, medical Power of Attorney, a HIPAA release form and a living will.

Speak with a local estate planning attorney who has experience in planning for young families.

Reference: KTVO.com (Feb. 6, 2019) “Family 411: Thinking about estate planning while your kids are young”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Plan, Minors, Guardian, Power of Attorney, Medical Power of Attorney, Beneficiary

Continue Reading

Family Meetings and Trustworthy Siblings Needed to Help Aging Parents

It gets tricky when aging parents start having problems managing their own financial and legal affairs. Siblings can be a challenge, if they lack the ability to understand the changing roles from adult child to caregiver, or if they don’t know how to manage the “business side” of life. That, says the Monterey Herald in the article “Financial planning: Family communication helps aging parents,” can lead to challenging circumstances for aging parents and siblings.

For one thing, parents are often reluctant to seek help, even if they are aware that things are not right. Notices of missed payments may be stuffed in a drawer or left to pile up in stacks on a desk that was once orderly and tidy. Depending on where adult children live, this state of affairs could go on for a very long time, until someone realizes that it’s not for lack of money, but their capacity is starting to diminish. If you are nearby and visit often, you may not notice until things are in a bad state. If you live far away, you may not know until an annual visit brings you to a home that’s in a state of disarray.

Some siblings are easy to work with and understand the challenges that aging parents face. However, others don’t have the temperament or the knowledge to help out. If they are estranged from the parents, they obviously won’t be much help and could get in the way. Trying to reach out and keeping them informed may be difficult. However, it may also be necessary.

If there is a good relationship with siblings and they all live relatively close to each other, the family should begin with a series of regular family meetings. Ideally, the parents call the first meeting to take place, and they are able to take the lead in explaining why everyone is gathering and what needs to be accomplished. If they are not capable of doing that, or don’t want to do that, because they don’t want to be seen as needy or pushy, then an older sibling usually steps up.

A family with a history of good communication can usually deal with the legal and financial matters in several meetings. A family that rarely talks or only speaks during the holidays will need to get accustomed to working with each other in a productive manner. Some families meet at their estate planning attorney’s office. The attorney can serve as a facilitator, while an estate plan is put into place. Often, a neutral, third-party meeting place can diffuse some of the old family dynamics, which often emerge when a family meets at the family home.

Start by putting together a summary of the parent’s situation. What are their expenses, and what are their sources of income? How are their investment accounts titled? Do they have an estate plan? Have they named beneficiaries for their retirement accounts and life insurance policies? Is there a long-term care policy in place? How is their home titled, and where is the deed located?

Having the answers to these questions, will also help you protect parents from financial elder abuse.

Evaluate their health with a realistic view. Do they have the health coverage they need? Are they independent now, and what is the prospect for their future independence? If they should become less able to live on their own, what will that look like? How will that be paid for?

Next, review their legal status. Do they have a will, power of attorney, health care power of attorney and HIPAA release form? If their estate plan has not been reviewed for more than three years, it needs to be updated. Many financial institutions and some health care facilities will not accept documents that are more than three to five years old. If any documents were created before HIPAA went into effect (2001), then they definitely need an updated estate plan.

The goal is to prepare as much as possible in advance, rather than reacting to a crisis. Increasing family communication around caring for aging parents can also bring siblings closer together, with a shared cause. Getting parents the care they need before an emergency, will also leave everyone in the family knowing they’ve done the right thing.

Reference: Monterey Herald (Feb. 20, 2019) “Financial planning: Family communication helps aging parents”

Suggested Key Terms: Aging Parents, Health Care Power of Attorney, HIPAA, Family Meetings, Estate Planning Attorney

Continue Reading

Digital Assets in Estate Planning: The Brave New World of Estate Planning

Cryptocurrency is almost mainstream, despite its complexity, says Insurance News Net in the article “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning.” The IRS has made it clear that as far as federal taxation is concerned, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are to be treated as property. However, since cryptocurrency is not tangible property, how is it incorporated into an estate plan?

For starters, recordkeeping is extremely important for any cryptocurrency owner. Records need to be kept that are current and income taxes need to be paid on the transactions every single year. When the owner dies, the beneficiaries will receive the cryptocurrency at its current fair market value. The cost basis is stepped up to the date of death value and it is includable in the decedent’s taxable estate.

Here’s where it gets tricky. The name of the Bitcoin or cryptocurrency owner is not publicly recorded. Instead, ownership is tied to a specific Bitcoin address that can only be accessed by the person who holds two “digital keys.” These are not physical keys, but codes. One “key” is public, and the other key is private. The private key is the secret number that allows the spending of the cryptocurrency.

Both of these digital keys are stored in a “digital wallet,” which, just like the keys, is not an actual wallet but a system used to secure payment information and passwords.

One of the dangers of cryptocurrency is that unlike other financial assets, if that private key is somehow lost, there is no way that anyone can access the digital currency.

It should also be noted that cryptocurrency can be included as an asset in a last will and testament as well as a revocable or irrevocable trust. However, cryptocurrency is highly volatile, and its value may swing wildly.

The executor or trustee of an estate or trust must take steps to ensure that the estate or the trust is in compliance with the Prudent Investor Act. The holdings in the trust or the estate will need to be diversified with other types of investments. If this is not followed, even ownership of a small amount of cryptocurrency may lead to many issues with how the estate or trust was being managed.

Digital currency and digital assets are two relatively new areas for estate planning, although both have been in common usage for many years. As more boomers are dying, planning for these intangible assets has become more commonplace. Failing to have a plan or providing incorrect directions for how to handle digital assets, is becoming problematic for many individuals.

Speak with an estate planning attorney who has experience in digital and non-traditional assets to learn how to protect your heirs and your estate from losses associated with these new types of assets.

Reference: Insurance News Net (Feb. 25, 2019) “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning”

Suggested Key Terms: Digital Assets, Estate Planning, Elder Law Attorney, Cryptocurrency, Digital Keys

Continue Reading